David Gillen

Dr. Gillen graduated in 1975 from the University of Toronto with a Ph.D in Economics. He currently holds the positions of YVR Professor of Transportation Policy in the Sauder School of Business and Director Centre for Transportation Studies, University of British Columbia. In addition he is Research Economist at the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He has held teaching and research positions at the University of Alberta, Wilfrid Laurier University and Queen’s University as well as Adjunct Professor of Economics at the University of Western Ontario and Adjunct Professor of Engineering and Environment and Planning at the University of Waterloo.

Dr. Gillen has published over 100 books, technical reports, journal papers, conference presentations, and other articles in various areas of transportation economics, including airline competition and industry structure, airport economics and noise externalities, and transportation policy in Canada and the United States. His current research includes evaluating investment in Intelligent Transportation Systems, pricing and auction mechanisms roadways and runways, the impact of taxation and user charges on firm competitiveness,
differing rules and mechanisms for allocating revenues and costs across  different users, measuring performance of transportation infrastructure, vertical contracts in aviation and evolving strategies and business models in airlines and airports.

Address

email: david.gillen(at)sauder.ubc.ca
website: Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia
david.gillen(at)sauder.ubc.ca
Sauder School of Business
University of British Columbia
Henry Angus Building 471
2053 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2
Canada
david.gillen(at)sauder.ubc.ca

Airneth columns and contributions to Airneth activities

David Gillen   06.04.2009 A new view of the airport business: two-sided platforms*

Airneth column by David Gillen>>

  12.04.2007 1st Airneth Annual Conference: Optimal use of scarce airport capacity

If shortages in airport capacity are here to stay, how can we use existing and future airport capacities most efficiently and effectively?>>